Compromise is key to changing U.S. politics

One of the central themes of this U.S. election year is the widespread desire for change in the political system.

Public opinion polls suggest that some 70 per cent of Americans support this view, and it helps to explain the rise in the unconventional candidacies of both Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, who tried to win the Democrats' presidential nomination.

Searching for justice(s): Trudeau’s better way to fill Supreme Court vacancies

At the risk of being summarily expelled from the Venerable Order of Pundits, Skeptics and Other Assorted Naysayers, I would like to venture a positive thought about a government initiative.

The government in question is the one in Ottawa headed by the shirtless one, Justin Trudeau. The initiative is the new procedure for selecting judges for the Supreme Court of Canada that was announced last week.

In the News: Loren King to swim across Lake Ontario

Loren King sees a few new wrinkles in his bathing trunks.

"In a few days, I'm going to be 48," said the Wilfrid Laurier University associate professor of political science, pondering his looming attempt to cross Lake Ontario in the first days of August.

"I'm an old guy for this swimming business."...

Continue reading at source...

Are winds of change blowing in Ontario?

The desire for a change is the political equivalent of a tsunami. If it is strong enough, it levels everything in its path, sweeping out the old and replacing the status quo with whatever strikes voters as new and, above all, different.

Brexit in the United Kingdom, ultra-nationalism in France, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump in the United States all testify to the immense power of the desire for change – as did the rise of Justin Trudeau and the Liberals from third place to majority government last year.

First Nations' Financial Reporting and Public Opinion in Canada

Dr. Jason Roy and I recently completed a study on this topic for the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.  The FCPP gave us some money to buy a sample and conduct a wording experiment on the effect of different levels of financial disclosure by Indigenous governments on public opinion towards Indigenous politicans and governments.

Beating a dead horse because I get letters!

Ok, you are probably sick of reading about my complaints re: regulation 274.  But I received yet another anonymous letter, this time of a newspaper clipping in which a number of anecdotes are underlined about alleged nepotism in teacher hiring in the past (and hence why we need seniority).

The Trouble With Hillary: an old-style pol in a pantsuit

"Look, I know how hard this job can be. That's why I know Hillary will be so good at it. In fact, I don't think there's ever been someone so qualified to hold this office" — Barack Obama endorsing Hillary Clinton

Even allowing for a soupçon of hyperbole, Obama is close to the mark. By conventional standards, Hillary is exceptionally well qualified to be president.

Opinion-Policy Nexus is a forum of opinion and commentary on topics related to public opinion and public policy. Views expressed in any blog entry are those of the author and do not reflect LISPOP's positions.

Authors
  • Ailsa Henderson
  • Andre Perrella
  • Anna Esselment
  • Anthony Piscitelli
  • Barry Kay
  • Ben Margulies
  • Christopher Alcantara
  • Christopher Cochrane
  • Geoffrey Stevens
  • Jason Roy
  • Jorg Broschek
  • Loren King
  • Manuel Riemer
  • Nikolaos Liodakis
  • Robert Williams
  • Simon Kiss
  • Zachary Spicer
Search