Geoffrey Stevens's blog

Not quite the dawning of the Age of Aquarius

In times past when the government had a really big deal to announce, or an item of long-anticipated legislation, it would pull out all the stops. Parliament would be primed. The prime minister would beam proudly while the sponsoring minister(s) explained in lavish terms how the new measure would dramatically improve the lives of ordinary Canadians, enhance democracy and make the nation stronger, safer and more prosperous. Then cabinet members would fan out across the land to deliver the glad tidings.

Hype like that.

Trump and the perils of governing by impulse

“People will tie themselves in knots trying to discern a linear, rational decision-making (process) from Trump. It’s never been part of his character and it’s never going to be.” – Tim O’Brien, a biographer of Donald Trump.

That’s scary.

The world is dealing with an American president who is motivated by impulse rather than strategy, by whim rather than rational decision-making.

Unscrambling this Conservative omelet is no simple task

Sorting out the federal Conservative leadership competition, with its 14 candidates, is bit like trying to unscramble an omelet. It would be simpler if, instead of a secret, preferential ballot weighted to give each of the 338 ridings an equal number of votes, the party had opted for an old-style brokered convention.

Why Justin Trudeau is a cheap date

The opposition parties worked themselves into a fair lather last week when Parliament was informed that it had cost taxpayers $127,000 for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his family to vacation in the Bahamas at Christmas.

“Completely outrageous,” snapped NDP leader Thomas Mulcair.

“When did the prime minister forget that it's his job to serve Canadians and not the other way around?” demanded Blaine Calkins, a Conservative from Alberta.