Geoffrey Stevens's blog

Why Andrew Scheer will be the next Conservative leader

Today’s Conservative Party of Canada is not your grandmother’s Conservative Party.  That much we know.

But what kind of party will it be going forward?  The answer will be determined in large measure by the outcome of the current leadership race. Candidates have one month left to sell party memberships in this one-member, one-vote competition, followed by two more months of campaigning before the votes are counted on May 27.

Who among the mob of candidates (there are 14 of them at present) will emerge as leader in May?

Speaking truth to power, but not in Donald Trump’s Washington

“The press is the enemy” – Richard Nixon to Henry Kissinger, 1972

“[The media] is the enemy of the American people” – Donald Trump, on Twitter, Feb. 17, 2017

The highest purpose of a free press is to speak truth to power.

From time to time that purpose is challenged by demagogues and embattled political leaders, as it is now in Donald Trump’s America, and it was in the early 1970s.

Trudeau will find dealing with Trump is like negotiating a mine field

There are probably a dozen places Justin  Trudeau would rather be than in Washington today for his first meeting with President Donald Trump – mercurial, unpredictable, egotistical, short-tempered and at times downright nasty, even to his nation’s close friends.

No amount of official briefing or gratuitous advice from editorial boards and columnists can adequately prepare the prime minister for the encounter. Like anxious parents prepping their five-year-old for his first day at school, these savants have filled Trudeau’s head with lists of things to do and don’t do.

The perils of keeping (or not) election promises

Election promises are fraught with danger for politicians.

Both Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau are learning about the perils of promises, although their enlightenment is coming from opposite directions. Trudeau is being savaged in Parliament, on the internet and in some quarters of the mainstream media for breaking a promise – to wit, that a Liberal government would replace Canada’s first-past-the-post electoral system and to do it before the next election in 2019.

The new bully on the block: petulant, delusional and perhaps unstable

The House of Commons returns to work today after its refreshing, one trusts, 46-day Christmas recess.

MPs will be anxious to tear into the great issues of the day in the Ottawa bubble, starting with the Prime Minister’s vacation in the Bahamas and continuing, no doubt, to the irksome question of how much, or little, the government is actually prepared to do about cash-for-access political fundraising.

But these matters, which loomed so large a couple of weeks ago, now seem trivial. The big stuff, the serious stuff, is happening south of the border, in Washington.